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Jump to navigation Jump to search This article is about albums of recorded music. Vinyl LPs are still issued, though album sales in the 21st-century have mostly focused on CD and MP3 formats. The audio cassette was a format used alongside vinyl from the 1970s into the first decade of the 2000s. The time frame for completely recording an album varies between a few hours to several years. Album covers and liner notes are used, and sometimes additional information is provided, such as analysis of the recording, and lyrics or librettos. Rome, was a board chalked or painted white, on which decrees, edicts and other public notices were inscribed in black. It was from this that in medieval and modern times album came to denote a book of blank pages in which verses, autographs, sketches, photographs and the like are collected. In the early nineteenth century “album” was occasionally used in the titles of some classical music sets, such as Schumann’s Album for the Young Opus 68, a set of 43 short pieces. When 78rpm records came out, the popular 10-inch disc could only hold about three minutes of sound per side, so almost all popular recordings were limited to around three minutes in length.

These albums came in both 10-inch and 12-inch sizes. While an album may contain as many or as few tracks as required, in the United States, The Recording Academy’s rules for Grammy Awards state that an album must comprise a minimum total playing time of 15 minutes with at least five distinct tracks or a minimum total playing time of 30 minutes with no minimum track requirement. If an album becomes too long to fit onto a single vinyl record or CD, it may be released as a double album where two vinyl LPs or compact discs are packaged together in a single case, or a triple album containing three LPs or compact discs. This section does not cite any sources. This may be done as a marketing promotion, or for other reasons. It is not uncommon to include singles as bonus tracks on re-issues of old albums, where those tracks weren’t originally included. A matching folio songbook is a compilation of the music notation of all the songs included in that particular album. It typically has the album’s artwork on its cover and, in addition to sheet music, it includes photos of the artist. Vinyl LP records have two sides, each comprising one-half of the album. If a pop or rock album contained tracks released separately as commercial singles, they were conventionally placed in particular positions on the album.

Double albums during the Seventies were sometimes sequenced for record changers. In the case of a two-record set, for example, sides 1 and 4 would be stamped on one record, and sides 2 and 3 on the other. The Compact Cassette was a popular medium for distributing pre-recorded music in the late 1970s through to the 1990s. The very first “Compact Cassette” was introduced by Philips in August 1963 in the form of a prototype. The compact disc format replaced both the vinyl record and the cassette as the standard for the commercial mass-market distribution of physical music albums. Most recently, the MP3 audio format has matured, revolutionizing the concept of digital storage. Early MP3 albums were essentially CD-rips created by early CD-ripping software, and sometimes real-time rips from cassettes and vinyl. Most albums are studio albums — that is, they are recorded in a recording studio with equipment meant to give those overseeing the recording as much control as possible over the sound of the album. They minimize external noises and reverberations and have highly sensitive microphones and sound mixing equipment.

This section needs additional citations for verification. Concert or stage performances are recorded using remote recording techniques. Live albums may be recorded at a single concert, or combine recordings made at multiple concerts. They may include applause and other noise from the audience, comments by the performers between pieces, improvisation, and so on. The best-selling live album worldwide is Garth Brooks’ Double Live, which shipped over 10. 5 million 2-CD sets in the United States alone as of November 2006. 500 Greatest Albums of All Time 18 albums were live albums. A solo album, in popular music, is an album recorded by a current or former member of a musical group which is released under that artist’s name only, even though some or all other band members may be involved.

The solo album appeared as early as the late 1940s. A performer may record a solo album for a number of reasons. A solo performer working with other members will typically have full creative control of the band, be able to hire and fire accompanists, and get the majority of the proceeds. The performer may be able to produce songs that differ widely from the sound of the band with which the performer has been associated, or that the group as a whole chose not to include in its own albums. A tribute or cover album is a collection of cover versions of songs or instrumental compositions. Its concept may involve various artists covering the songs of a single artist, genre or period, a single artist covering the songs of various artists or a single artist, genre or period, or any variation of an album of cover songs which is marketed as a “tribute”. Life After the Album Is Going to Get Weird. Why Are Songs on the Radio About the Same Length? Archived from the original on March 29, 2007. TO TRANSITION TO ONLINE VOTING FOR THE 60″.

version bonus tracks